Aimer, c'est vivre.

Still can’t get over how beautiful Chefchaouen was. #Morocco #BlueCity #nofilter #Chefchaouen #colors

Still can’t get over how beautiful Chefchaouen was. #Morocco #BlueCity #nofilter #Chefchaouen #colors

I’ve stopped being sorry for all my soft. I won’t apologize because I miss you, or because I said it, or because I text you first, or again. I think everyone spends too much time trying to close themselves off. I don’t want to be cool or indifferent, I want to be honest.

Azra.T “Don’t Wait Three Days to Text First.”  (via xixlilies)

I want to say this to you.

(via adventuresofastudentteacher)

(Source: 5000letters)

The view from my roof in Morocco. Loving my new temporary home!

The view from my roof in Morocco. Loving my new temporary home!

How I came to appreciate state standards.

You know how we all complain about things and talk about how they should be, thinking that we are the most brilliant people in the world? Well I have come to see that some of my grand theories is, indeed, incorrect.

In the US, we like to complain about the standards. “They’re too constricting to what I can teach.” “They’re too much for the kids.” “Why do students even have to know that.”

I’m here to tell you that detailed standards for each grade level are not only important, but also highly beneficial. Here at the school I am student teaching in, they are working a lot on vertical alignment. Because it is an international school in another country, they are trying to run the American curriculum, but are not bound by state standards. At the beginning of the year, they set up the scope and sequence for each grade level. It’s vague and some teacher stray away.

Accountability is hard to maintain because there is not major assessment that tells exactly what was taught. My school emphasizes discussing with the teachers below and above to maintain as seamless of a curriculum as possible, but it has taught me to appreciate the state standards more. I know exactly what content to cover and exactly how familiar my students should be with it.

I understand that common core and state standards are FAR from perfect and that I have been fortunate enough to learn and work in states that are more flexible with them. They are not my ideal system, but I do see the positives of having them.

(Source: pikagif)

digbicks:

Art on your sleeve: Classic works of art reinvented as classic album covers, Christophe Gowans

  1. Duchamp
  2. Venus de Milo
  3. Munch
  4. Magritte
  5. Vermeer
  6. Da Vinci
  7. Van Gogh
  8. Van Gogh
  9. Sir Henry Raeburn
  10. Franz Kline

(Source: ceegworld.com)

A fez. Because today I am going to Fez! #MoroccoBound #fez

A fez. Because today I am going to Fez! #MoroccoBound #fez

To all first year teachers:

itsssnix:

Teaching is a marathon, not a sprint. You don’t have to be an expert your first year. Work hard, yes, but also give yourself grace.

If you feel like you’re not doing enough, that’s a good sign you’re doing just fine. So breathe and don’t beat yourself up.

theatlantic:

A Nationalist Brain: There’s Nothing So Satisfying As Belonging to a Group

It was a good old-fashioned Olympic scandal in Sochi, when South Korean figure skater Kim Yuna, known as “the Queen,” lost to a less experienced Russian. The judgment spurred millions of angry Tweets, and a Change.org petition protesting the result was the fastest growing one on site record—reportedly more than 1.2 million signatures in about 12 hours.
Skating officials and fans around the world have questioned the decision, but critics remain focused on the South Korean outrage, largely since their sports fanaticism has made headlines before. Diehard citizens of countries like South Korea may seem odd to some; a post on Yahoo had the misguided headline: “Deal with it, South Korea.” But this line of thinking fails to understand the nature of nationalism, an ideology strongly associated with war and extremism that is in fact a common psychological phenomenon seen in everyday life—including sports.
Read more. [Image: Vhadim Ghirda/AP Photo]

theatlantic:

A Nationalist Brain: There’s Nothing So Satisfying As Belonging to a Group

It was a good old-fashioned Olympic scandal in Sochi, when South Korean figure skater Kim Yuna, known as “the Queen,” lost to a less experienced Russian. The judgment spurred millions of angry Tweets, and a Change.org petition protesting the result was the fastest growing one on site record—reportedly more than 1.2 million signatures in about 12 hours.

Skating officials and fans around the world have questioned the decision, but critics remain focused on the South Korean outrage, largely since their sports fanaticism has made headlines before. Diehard citizens of countries like South Korea may seem odd to some; a post on Yahoo had the misguided headline: “Deal with it, South Korea.” But this line of thinking fails to understand the nature of nationalism, an ideology strongly associated with war and extremism that is in fact a common psychological phenomenon seen in everyday life—including sports.

Read more. [Image: Vhadim Ghirda/AP Photo]

monalicia:

Lately, I’ve been kind of discouraged as far as teaching goes. My supervising teacher says I’m doing well, my coordinator says I’m doing well, but I feel so bummed? I feel like I don’t know anything, or how to do anything. I don’t know what’s effective, or just fun, or effective AND fun, because I just know what it will be like in my head (and that’s usually not how things turn out).

I feel you! I had to sit in a grade level meeting and talk about what makes an effective and engaging learning environment. They wanted me to share and I suddenly felt like I knew nothing about education. You’re definitely not alone!

Student teaching has taught me how much time I used to waste doing nothing.

While I still love my occasional veg days, I spend more of my life doing productive things. I feel so much better about myself. I feel like I have a clearer direction and purpose.

Male privilege is “I have a boyfriend” being the only thing that can actually stop someone from hitting on you because they respect another man more than they respect your rejection/lack of interest.

—The Sociological Cinema (via bitternectar)

(Source: queerintersectional)